Visiting the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station

Photo courtesy of UW-Madison CALS

Photo courtesy of UW-Madison CALS

Nancy Esser
Research Program Manager
Superintendent of the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
University of Wisconsin- Madison
nmesser@wisc.edu
(715) 387-2523

Nancy Esser talks about research conducted at the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station.

3:01 – Total Time

0:17 – Marshfield ARS overview
0:56 – New dairy scientist on board
1:16 – Information for the community and world
2:14 – Future of work at the station
2:50 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: New activities at the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station. We’re visiting today with Nancy Esser, Superintendent of the station, University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Nancy, give us a quick overview of the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station.

Nancy Esser: The Marshfield Agricultural Research Station is approximately 14hundred acres of which we conduct agronomic research trials and grow crops that are needed to supply the herd of about 650 animals. The focus of the station is the heifer based research that occurs here. We also have a partnership with the USDA and the Institute for Environmentally Integrated Dairy Management. We house 125 to 130 dairy cows and assist their researchers in conducting nutrient based research.

Sevie Kenyon: Nancy, could you describe some of the dairy research going on here?

Nancy Esser: This year what’s new and exciting is we welcomed a new dairy scientist, Dr. Matt Akins. Matt has a research study using genomic data to determine residual feed intake.

Sevie Kenyon: Nancy, give us a little idea how this station relates to the agricultural producers here in the area.

Nancy Esser: The local impact I see, we’re a telephone call away for answering questions. We’ve hosted many, many tours. We’re a site for not only youth and curious adults, but also for professionals in the agricultural industry. The Marshfield Ag Research Station is available to answer the questions, to invite those folks out who have the questions to problem solve. We’re a resource that’s available to all producers. When a producer wants information, they’re going to Google for it and they’re going to find that the University of Wisconsin has that information and that could be someone in the Marshfield area or across the globe. So the information that comes out of this station, there’s a lot of applicability to anybody in production agriculture.

Sevie Kenyon: Describe the kinds of activities you expect to be doing here at the station 5, 10, 20 years down the road.

Nancy Esser: I see a lot of things happening at Marshfield. We’ve got a new management team in the last five years; we’re welcoming a lot of new scientists. I see a lot of growth. We have a strong team of staff with us and I think we’re going to see more and more. There’s a much more stronger collaboration that’s been building between the UW and the USDA and we’re starting to see more and more of the environmental research as it relates to how the livestock industry is impacting our environment. So I’m thinking that those are the types of things that we’re going to be seeing.

Sevie Kenyon: We’ve been visiting with Nancy Esser, Superintendent Marshfield Agricultural Research Station, University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

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