New labels for blade tenderized meat

beef-ribeye-steak-1037130_1920Jeff Sindelar, Extension meats specialist
Department of Animal Science
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
jsindelar@wisc.edu
(608) 262-0555

Jeff Sindelar explains what the new labeling for blade tenderized meats means to consumers.

2:40 – Total Time
0:12 – Blade tenderized meat has new label
0:37 – What blade tenderized is
0:53 – Label no states blade tenderized
1:08 – New label for food safety
1:42 – Cooking instructions included
2:07 – Blade tenderizing very common
2:29 – Lead out

 

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Look for new label changes on certain cuts of meat. We’re visiting today with Jeff Sindelar Department of Animal Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Jeff you were just talking about new labeling for certain cuts of meat, what is the new label?

Jeff Sindelar: The next time that you head over to your local grocery store, supermarket, butcher shop you may notice some small, but important changes to your favorite roasts, steaks, or chops, and that is, you might find the words “blade tenderized.”

Sevie Kenyon: Jeff can you describe for us what blade tenderizing is?

Jeff Sindelar: Sure, blade tenderize is simply the process of using a machine that will tenderize roasts, steaks, and chops so that we as consumers can have a wonderful eating experience.

Sevie Kenyon: And how does the labeling affect what we do?

Jeff Sindelar: Well, there’s going to be a labeling change which is going into effect here in the middle of June, which will require any piece of meat that has been blade tenderized to state that on the label.

Sevie Kenyon:  Jeff, why were these label changes made?

Jeff Sindelar: These label changes were made in an effort to improve food safety. So, in the past few years there’s been a few food borne illness outbreaks that have been associated with blade tenderized cuts and because of this the U.S. government decided it was important for all consumers to be aware that a particular cut, roast, steak or chop was blade tenderized in order so that we as consumers can appropriately cook that product to make sure that no bacteria exist.

Sevie Kenyon: Are these new labels going to have some instructions or help for consumers when they buy the meat?

Jeff Sindelar: They sure will, in addition to the words “blade tenderized” being on the label, there will also be some specific cooking instructions and likely those cooking instructions will say heat to 145 degrees for at least five minutes and if you follow those cooking instructions you can be assured that that products will be absolutely safe to consume

Sevie Kenyon:  Jeff, how common are blade tenderized cuts?

Jeff Sindelar:  Blade tenderized cuts are very common, just as we as consumers blade tenderize a variety of cuts in own homes the meat and poultry industry blade tenderizes many cuts perhaps up to 25 to 30 percent of all roasts, steaks and chops are blade tenderized today and again it’s a very important technology because it helps improve the quality of these cuts.

Sevie Kenyon: We’ve been visiting today with Jeff Sindelar Department of Animal Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

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