An update on safe use of steam canners

The University of Wisconsin-Madison conducted research showing that an atmospheric steam canner may be used to safely can naturally acid foods such as peaches, pears, and apples, or acidified-foods such as salsa or pickles. The steam canner uses only ~2 quarts of water (compared to 16 quarts, or more, in a boiling water canner) so […]

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Canning update: successful jar sealing

Successful jar sealing often begins, and ends, with the lids.  Home canning requires use of a 2-piece sealing system, a flat metal lid and a metal band. Several years ago, manufacturers such as Ball changed the design of the lids to increase rust resistance and seal-ability and most lids no longer need to be preheated.  […]

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Safe substitutions when canning

The safety of the food that you preserve for your family and friends is important to you. The University of Wisconsin Division of Extension supports using up-to-date, research-tested recipes so that you know that the food that you preserve is both safe and high in quality. Here are a few quick tips on changes and […]

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Food safety precautions for July 4th

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have released food safety and health tips for celebrating this 4th of July. Planning to enjoy a picnic, barbecue, or meal under the summer sun on this holiday weekend? Remember to pack your picnic basket with food safety in mind, […]

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At the end of canning, why wait 5-10 minutes?

Many current home canning recommendations suggest a 5 to 10 minute wait at the end of the canning process prior to removing jars from the canner. Why is this wait time now included in some canning recipes and it is necessary for safety? Some home canning recipes, such as the Ball (Fresh Preserving) recipe for Classic […]

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A fresh look at steam canning

It’s jam and jelly season! Let’s review the use of an atmospheric steam canner for canning acid foods. The University of Wisconsin-Madison conducted research showing that an atmospheric Steam Canner may be used to safely can naturally acid foods such as peaches, pears, and apples, or acidified-foods such as salsa or pickles. The atmospheric steam canner […]

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Food Safety News You can Use from the Division of Extension

Summer weather can bring heavy rains and power outages due to lightening and high winds. Extension has information that you can use to keep yourself and your family food-safe.

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Unsafe canning practice: ‘dry canning’ vegetables

A second method of ‘dry canning’ has surfaced, even more unsafe than the first.  One unsafe method of dry canning is oven ‘canning’ of dry goods such as dry beans, nuts or flour. This method of ‘preserving’ dry foods really isn’t canning and it isn’t considered safe.  A second method of ‘dry canning’ involves placing […]

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Positive Salmonella test leads to recall of macadamia nuts

An Illinois company is recalling raw macadamia nuts because of positive test results for Salmonella linked to the batch of nuts. NOW Health Group Inc. (NOW) of Bloomingdale, IL, is recalling its “NOW Real Food Raw Macadamia Nuts” with the product code 7119 and  Lot#3141055, according to a company recall notice posted by the Food […]

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Caution against canning white-fleshed peaches and nectarines

Unlike their yellow-fleshed cousins, white-fleshed peaches (Prunus persica) boast a creamy pinkish-white flesh that is sweeter to taste and low in acidity. Because the peach tree is a self-fertilizing tree, white peaches occur in nature, but they also develop as a result of hybridization. Varieties of white peaches have been documented as early as the […]

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