An update on safe use of steam canners

The University of Wisconsin-Madison conducted research showing that an atmospheric steam canner may be used to safely can naturally acid foods such as peaches, pears, and apples, or acidified-foods such as salsa or pickles. The steam canner uses only ~2 quarts of water (compared to 16 quarts, or more, in a boiling water canner) so […]

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Canning update: successful jar sealing

Successful jar sealing often begins, and ends, with the lids.  Home canning requires use of a 2-piece sealing system, a flat metal lid and a metal band. Several years ago, manufacturers such as Ball changed the design of the lids to increase rust resistance and seal-ability and most lids no longer need to be preheated.  […]

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At the end of canning, why wait 5-10 minutes?

Many current home canning recommendations suggest a 5 to 10 minute wait at the end of the canning process prior to removing jars from the canner. Why is this wait time now included in some canning recipes and it is necessary for safety? Some home canning recipes, such as the Ball (Fresh Preserving) recipe for Classic […]

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What does ‘use a tested recipe’ mean in home food preservation?

The University of Wisconsin issued recommendations a few years ago for safely using an atmospheric steam canner for home canning of naturally acid or acidified foods. The atmospheric steam canner has some advantages over a boiling water canner for processing high acid foods.  Research recommendations indicated that naturally acid foods, such as peaches, apples, jams […]

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