Finding reliable information online

It’s so often challenging to sort through all the information found online. How can a person tell if the information is from a reliable source?  And from an Extension-educator standpoint, how do we know that the information is based on credible research so that we can feel comfortable passing that information on to consumers?  I’ll […]

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Safe handling of cooked rice

I received a question about the safety of reheating cooked rice. It seems that internet sites caution against reheating rice (at all), or reheating rice only once, or storing cooked rice for only 1 day before eating and/or discarding. Another site suggested that rice had to reheated; in other words that it was dangerous to eat […]

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Fruit and Vegetable Safety

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) eating a diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables provides important health benefits, but it’s important that you select and prepare them safely. Fruits and vegetables add nutrients to your diet that help protect you from heart disease, stroke, and some cancers. In addition, choosing […]

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Focus on Food Safety When Making Maple Syrup

Making maple syrup is a time-honored tradition in many parts of Wisconsin, and it is as much of an art as a science. Even though sap does run in other trees such as birch and elm in early spring, maples produce more and sweeter sap than any other tree. Collection. Once trees are tapped, a […]

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What does ‘use a tested recipe’ mean in home food preservation?

The University of Wisconsin issued recommendations a few years ago for safely using an atmospheric steam canner for home canning of naturally acid or acidified foods. The atmospheric steam canner has some advantages over a boiling water canner for processing high acid foods.  Research recommendations indicated that naturally acid foods, such as peaches, apples, jams […]

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Infant Botulism: What you need to know

A recent recall of baby food in Canada due to the risk for botulism poisoning (February, 2019) following on 4 cases of infant botulism poisoning in the U.S. linked to honey-containing pacifiers (November, 2018) suggests that it’s a good time to remind everyone that botulism is dangerous for all ages, but particularly for infants and young […]

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Washing Produce: Watch these videos to help you do it correctly!

The University of California-Davis has created two videos that will be helpful for educators and consumers interested in produce safety! Dr. Christine Bruhn, Director of the Center for Consumer Research at U.C. Davis, provides up-to-date, easy to understand information that consumers (and educators) can use for safe in-home handling and preparation of fresh produce. An […]

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Leftovers and Food Safety

In my family, I tend to prefer the term ‘planned-overs’ to the term ‘leftovers’ – I am ‘planning’ to serve a soup or casserole again that week! Whether it’s food prepared at home, or more of a restaurant meal than can be eaten in one sitting, there are some basic steps to assure that planned-overs […]

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The color of poultry

The color of raw chicken and turkey does not usually change as much as beef and other ‘red meats.’ Raw poultry can vary from a bluish-white to yellow. All of these colors are normal and are a direct result of breed, exercise, age, and/or diet. Younger poultry has less fat under the skin, which can […]

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Can you tell if meat is safe by looking?

While handling food safely using the 4 basic steps of cook, clean, chill and separate is important, we encourage consumers to also use their senses to guide decision-making.  Does the product look and smell OK? Often a bright, attractive color leads a consumer to choose a particular package of beef from the grocery store. So, […]

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